Calcium carbonate

 

Calcium carbonate (Calcite Stone), which is called CaCO3 for short, is naturally extracted from the mines as small rocks as limestone, marble and chalk.

Among the rocks in which calcium carbonate is found in nature, the most commonly known are aragonite, calcite, vaterite, chalk, limestone, marble and travertine. Hydrochloric acid or sulfuric acid is used to detect the presence of calcium carbonate on a rock.

Calcium carbonate is one of the most versatile mineral fillers and is consumed in a wide range of products such as paper, paint, plastic, rubber, textile, caulks, sealants and printing inks.

Calcium carbonate, which is brought in powder form after various processes, is produced in two ways on an industrial scale. It is transported from the quarry and naturally occurring deposits and in some cases benefits. It is also made by precipitation from dissolved calcium hydroxide and carbon dioxide. Natural ground calcium carbonate and precipitated material compete industrially, mainly based on particle size and properties given to a product.

Calcium carbonate is one of the most versatile mineral fillers and is consumed in a wide range of products such as paper, paint, plastic, rubber, textile, caulks, sealants and printing inks.

High purity levels of both natural and precipitated calcium carbonate, in the field of Food Chemicals, as an additive under the name E170 and meet the requirements of the United States Pharmacopeia and are used in toothpastes, cosmetics, foods and medicines and soy milk.

In the field of medicine, it is used in the stabilization of phosphate compounds, in binding of phosphorus in foods, in cases of chronic kidney failure, which has lost kidney function and cannot remove the phosphorus in the blood by urine.

Calcium carbonate naturally comes in three crystal structures: calcite, aragonite and rarely vaterite. Commercial calcium carbonate calcite, aragonite or sedimentary chalk obtained from natural sources. In most precipitated grades, aragonite is the dominant crystal structure. Calcium carbonate is listed as a food additive and is not considered a toxic substance.

Exposure to dust is regulated and regulated calcium carbonates both naturally ground and precipitated low in recent years, calcium carbonate has been shown to play an important role in achieving environmental balance. It may contain impurities at levels.